Sir John Mogg School, Detmold, Germany

| April 29, 2008 | 3 Comments 

A great day at Sir John Mogg School,  Detmold, one of the SCE schools in Germany.

Not all changes in technology are advances!

However, one of the best elements of today was the fact that the school hall had a back-lit projection screen. Not remarkable technology but a great use of an image.

In other words, the projector was behind the screen, which meant that the image was lovely and clear but there was no light to shine in the eyes of any child who came up to the front to hot-seat being one of the characters in the games.

Well done indeed to the two children who became remarkable “owners of the greenhouse”. I am often startled by how immersed these children become, but, today left me with a huge lump in my throat. They were so believable, mysterious and… convincing!

All I do, when we have identified someone who might be “up for the challenge” is to ask them to imagine they are wearing, perhaps, a cloak or some other costume. It works best when they walk around, as this gives them the chance to immerse themselves in the character they create.

To go from sitting down, just the few metres “into” the environment, is a journey of many miles in imagination.

Quite a few times I have heard classmates say things like “How does she KNOW the answers?!” or “Does he REALLY live here?!”

Three great sessions today. the afternoone session, with A LOT of Year 1s and 2s was… surreal at times, but they really pulled together and, by the end of the session the year 2s were coming up with some excellent similes!

Games can work, as an article in the Guardian today, by John Kirriemuir, attests.

A big thumbs up to Mike Silvani, head Ann-Marie Mason, all the staff and children from Sir John Mogg School, today!

Sometimes it takes a little bit of time for the full extent of magic to make itself be known. My Y6 class were certainly enthused when we returned from our session with Tim. They described it as ‘the best literacy lesson ever!’ (I’d like to think that they have just forgotten some of the great lessons we have had!!) But the proof really has been in the steady trickle of stories that they have brought to me over the last couple of weeks. These stories have been written by the children in their own time and are a real testament to the depth that Tim’s teaching is able to reach. The stories are filled with superb description of setting and character, with brave vocabulary choices and a writer’s involvement that instantly engages the reader. How clever to use something that children instantly relate to, computer games, in such a creative and productive way.

Liz Miller

 

Category: 1) Events and Training days

Comments (3)

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  1. Mike Silvani says:

    A great day for children and staff at Sir John Mogg School. We were inspired and enthralled by the way Tim drew us into the real world on the other side of the screen, and then used this as a springboard to prompt enthusiastic, imaginative writing.

  2. Gary Margerison says:

    I joined a Tim Rylands day at SJM school. The children reacted well to the lesson and were able to produce some great written work.

    I was able to join SJM, Weser and Lister schools for an INSET day on Wednesday, everyone came away from the day with something to take to their classes and use to raise standards.

  3. Liz Miller says:

    Sometimes it takes a little bit of time for the full extent of magic to make itself be known. My Y6 class were certainly enthused when we returned from our session with Tim. They described it as ‘the best literacy lesson ever!’ (I’d like to think that they have just forgotten some of the great lessons we have had!!) But the proof really has been in the steady trickle of stories that they have brought to me over the last couple of weeks. These stories have been written by the children in their own time and are a real testament to the depth that Tim’s teaching is able to reach. The stories are filled with superb description of setting and character, with brave vocabulary choices and a writer’s involvement that instantly engages the reader. How clever to use something that children instantly relate to, computer games, in such a creative and productive way.

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